Thursday, September 21, 2006

Photo Extravaganza

I'm not kidding. If Blogger lets me, I'm going to show you every picture I ever took of the Raglan Cardigan I just finished.

Let's begin at the beginning, as they say. I have a photo of the original thrift store man's sweater at home - but I'll insert that later. Which means for the moment we start with the pattern.
Good Ol' Style 7194, which I first went on about here. I hunted rather desperately for some time for a good basic cardigan pattern, only to discover it on my shelf in a vintage book called Campus Hand Knits. I also discovered after I was half-way through the cardigan that I had a nearly identical pattern that's knit in the round and debated frogging the whole thing to start over. In the end, I nixed this plan because the unevenness of the yarn meant I needed to block every piece face down before assembly for a smooth surface.

This project involved my first pockets, which I talk about here.


They are still virtually invisible.
Below you can see the reverse of the button flap. Edge of the cuff!
Neckline!
Finished sweater! (Blogger won't allow me to post any more photos, so here's a link.)

I used US#8 straights. There was a ton of splicing and tucking, of course, but fortunately this yarn hides it well. The color is actually a brown with a reddish-burgundy cast to it, like the buttons. I think I might have enough leftover yarn to make a pullover vest - we'll see.

Overall, this wasn't as fussy as some of my past projects.

5 comments:

Jeanette said...

I am glad that blogger chose to let you post photos today

Anonymous said...

The sweater is lovely! I love the yarn.

Christine said...

Thanks!

Carrie K said...

The cardigan looks great! How did you work your buttonholes? They look good.

Yay that blogger and you are posting pix again!

Christine said...

The button flap was worked with the body of the pieces (...P1, K7, sl 1, K7, turn, P15, K1...) - the slip stitch being the edge when it's folded over. So the buttonholes were simply bind off button holes to live up and sew together.